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Bing Crosby and the Bells of St Mary's


Bing Crosby was the direct descendant of William Brewster and has hereditary links to John Howland and Edward Winslow all of whom sailed on the Mayflower. William Brewster was an Elder in the Separatist movement and was instrumental in them leaving England for Holland.




Bing was well known for singing “The Bells of St Mary’s” which is a reference to our very own church of St Mary’s. The inspiration for the song came to Adams and Furber while they were in Southampton during the First World War and heard the bells chiming across the town.


The bells were installed in 1914 and were a gift from Mary Wingrove in honour of her late husband. Sadly they were damaged in the blitz of 1940. In 1948 the bells were returned (see image) having been recast and rebuilding the church began in 1954. The church we know today was reconsecrated on Tuesday, 12th June, 1956.


The Bells of St. Mary's Ah, hear they are calling The young loves, the true loves Who come from the sea

And so my beloved When red leaves are falling The love bells shall ring out, ring out For you and me

The Bells of St. Mary's Ah, hear they are calling The young loves, the true loves Who come from the sea

And so my beloved When red leaves are falling The love bells shall ring out, ring out For you and me


Songwriters: A. Emmett Adams, Douglas Furber.




There are two further stories connecting St Mary’s to the Mayflower but they are for another time.

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